kestrell: (Default)
From the e-mail announcement:

The purpose of the Artists-Making-Art list is so that we can explore art with all our senses. We want to encourage each other to make art.
We want to share what we make as well as how we make it. Everyone is welcome. Join us on this journey of self-expression.

(it is hoped that the list can generate enough interest to start an artists and art division in the NFB. To subscribe to the list either go to:
http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/artists-making-art_nfbnet.org

or send e-mail to
artists-making-art-request@nfbnet.org
and put the word subscribe in the subject line.
kestrell: (Default)
Cross-posted to the Arisia LJ

This year we will once again be having the tactile tour of the Arisia art show. While the precise day and time has not yet been scheduled, we already have our volunteer docent and we are arranging to provide cotton gloves for the participants.

If you are an artist who wishes her or his art to be experienced by those with vision or other sensory impairments during the tactile art show, there should be a checkbox on the Arisia art show entry form which allows you to communicate this to the organizers. Only art which has been expressly allowed to be touched will be included in the tactile art tour. Artists are also encouraged to be present during the tour, and may give a very short explanation of their work if they so desire (a couple of sentences works well with our time limitation).

This tour usually lasts an hour, sometimes a little over an hour. People without sensory impairments are very welcome to attend the tour but, since the size of the group has to be limited in order to move through the show, priority is given to people with disabilities.
kestrell: (Default)
“How the Blind View Art”
6pm at the Open Door Gallery, 89 South Street, Boston
Simon Hayhoe, will introduce his research project being conducted at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Panel Discussion: Reactions to the current gallery show, Who is a Deaf artist?, featuring the work of Jiayi Zhou with audio description by Vince Lombardi. Preview the show and access the Audio Description at http://www.vsamass.org/gallery.php

Panelists:
Janet LaBreck, Commissioner, Massachusetts Commission for the Blind.
Bill Henderson, retired Boston Public School principal
Kim Charlson, director of the Perkins Braille and Talking Book Library
Carl Richardson, Massachusetts State House ADA Coordinator.

Simon Hayhoe, from the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science at the London School of Economics, is currently a Fulbright Fellow undertaking research on visually impaired people's understanding of exhibits at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the exhibits presented in their database of art works online. He wrote the monograph, Arts, Culture and Blindness, God Money and Politics, and Arts Culture and Blindness.

Earlier in the day:

“Is Belief More Important Than Perception to Blind Students Studying Fine Art?”
12:00pm at the Harvard Graduate School of Education in the Eliot-Lyman Room, Longfellow
Hall, 13 Appian Way, Cambridge

Simon Hayhoe will present a lecture on visual culture and blindness. Contact Scott Ruescher in the AIE program at scott_ruescher@harvard.edu for other information.
kestrell: (Default)
The American Printing House for the Blind is selling this kind of cool board game called
Treks
https://shop.aph.org/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_TREKS:%20The%20Game%20of%20Compass%20Directions_1-08910-00P_10001_11051
which I admit I thought was much more cool when I thought it was a handheld gadget and before I found out the price was $109.

Since this could be a really great way for visually-impaired kids--or even adults-- to learn about navigating their neighborhood or the neighborhood where their school is (I would actually like to have one of these for MIT), I wanted to figure out what it would take for someone to make a less expensive DIY version.

You can buy blank game boards here
http://www.barebooks.com/gameboards.htm
$3.95 for just the board, $7.95 for the kit.

Tactile dice are pretty easy to find: get the folks at Pandemonium to order some for you or you can order these
Giant Tactile Dice Black with White Dots for $4.95 at Amazon.com.

You could probably make an overlay from one of those clear plastic covers kids use for class reports, just add your own braille labels or raised dots, let's call that $5 spent at your local CVS or Staples.

You can purchase these
Bump Dots Medium Clear Round 20 per pack by Maxi-Aids
for $2.62 on Amazon
or you could use puff paint--let's splurge and say we want to use all the colors--
Tulip 3D Fashion Paint 1-1/4 Ounces 6/Pkg-Puffy by Duncan $23.75 on Amazon.

Rounding up to whole dollar amounts that still comes in under $50, less than half the price of the original game.
kestrell: (Default)
Kes: I'm hoping to find someone to go to this with me.

Wednesday, October 5th

“Is Belief More Important Than Perception to Blind Students Studying Fine Art?”
12:00pm at the Harvard Graduate School of Education
Simon Hayhoe will present a lecture on visual culture and blindness at the Harvard Graduate School of Education on Appian Way in Cambridge. Contact Scott Ruescher in the AIE program at scott_ruescher@harvard.edu for the exact location and other information.

“How the Blind View Art”
6pm at the Open Door Gallery
Simon Hayhoe, will introduce his research project being conducted at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

Panel Discussion: Reactions to the current gallery show, Who is a Deaf artist?, featuring the work of Jiayi Zhou with audio description by Vince Lombardi. Preview the show at http://www.vsamass.org/gallery.php

Panelists:
Janet LaBreck, Commissioner, Massachusetts Commission for the Blind.
Bill Henderson, retired Boston Public School principal
Kim Charlson, director of the Perkins Braille and Talking Book Library
Carl Richardson, Massachusetts State House ADA Coordinator.

Simon Hayhoe, from the Centre for Philosophy of Natural and Social Science at the London School of Economics, is currently a Fulbright Fellow undertaking research on visually impaired people's understanding of exhibits at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York and the exhibits presented in their database of art works online. He wrote the monograph, Arts, Culture and Blindness and the autobiographical book, Touching the Rock: An Experience of Blindness.
kestrell: (Default)
As it turns out, Alexx followed up on the marvelous toy suggestions
http://kestrell.livejournal.com/649778.html
and managed to locate my marvelous toy, which is called a Quix
http://www.amazon.com/Quix-Space-Changers/dp/B003G79QVI
which is also referred to as a "sculpture toy."

Coincidentally, one of the artists I have been intrigued by lately is
Alexander Calder
http://calder.org/life.html
who was known for making wire sculptures from hardware store wire and found objects
http://www.thecityreview.com/calder.html
although he is also famous as the inventor of the mobile: "The name "mobile" was given by his friend Marcel Duchamp, a perfect description for the abstract, airborne sculptures that Calder liberated from 'mass,' incorporating movement as a "material" itself for the first time. The sculptor described it as 'drawing in space.' " [quoted from the above-mentioned Web page]
That quote from Calder about using wire as a means of drawing three-dimensionally makes him particularly accessible to talking about art for blind people.

Calder is also famous for his toy circus made up of moving wire sculptures. You can watch a video here
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6jwnu8Izy0 .
kestrell: (Default)
1. Here's the link to the Facebook page for visually impaired photographers
https://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=133294703352148&v=wall

2. Visually impaired photographer features in Nokia commercial

A visually impaired photographer features in a brand new TV
advertisement for the latest Nokia camera phone. Gary Waite, a
photographer from Croydon stars in the advertisement as he wanders
around Blackpool taking photos with the camera phone. Waite unearthed
his talent for photography with the help of charity PhotoVoice.
PhotoVoice was set up to empower disadvantaged communities across the UK
and the world through photography. The charity works with amateur and
commercial photographers from Leeds to Lebanon on various projects that
highlight and capture the plight of disadvantaged communities.
Waite participated in the Sights Unseen project for the charity teaching
visually impaired and blind people sensory photography techniques. Waite
said:

“I’ve been taught to use my other senses to take pictures.
“For instance, hearing and smelling the sea air and the sound of the
roller coaster then, like every photographer, taking as many shots as
possible.”
from http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-12596142

3. And here's a few of my favorite entries from a list of famous blind and visually impaired people
http://www.foroyaa.gm/modules/news/article.php?storyid=7305
continued below cut )
kestrell: (Default)
From VSA of Massachusetts
https://www.facebook.com/pages/VSA-arts-of-Massachusetts/167783866028

1. Please Join Us For An Artful Adventure!
Designed For Children on the Autism Spectrum

The Artful Adventures Program at The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston Invites Children Age 8-12 Years on the Autism Spectrum To Explore Art and Art Making With Their Parent or Caregiver

Please Choose One Date:
Thursday, July 28, 2011 at 10:30am.
Saturday, July 30, 2011 at 10:30am.

This FREE program will last about 90 minutes during which participants will Explore the MFA’s galleries with a trained instructor, for an interactive, visitor-centered tour. We’ll then go to an art studio to Create a personal work of art to take home. At the conclusion of the program participants will be invited to evaluate their experience. Attendance is limited. Pre-registration is required by Monday, July 25, 2011.

For more information or to pre-register email artfuladventures@mfa.org
Or call 617-369-3303.

2. Salsa In The Park returns for its fourth summer!

Come enjoy free outdoor dancing in the South End's Blackstone Square park every Monday night from 6-9pm until August 29th (except July 4th).

Silent Rhythms is the new program for the deaf and hard of hearing that makes learning how to dance fun, easy and accessible! In addition to the Beginner and Advanced Beginner classes that is taught by MetaMovements, Silent Rhythms will be teaching a class from 6pm to 7pm inside Blackstone Community Center next to the Blackstone Park. This class will be taught in sign language by a deaf dancer who has performed all around the world.

When: Every Monday from 6pm to 9pm
From June 13th through August 29th

Where: Blackstone Square Park
50 West Brookline Street
Boston, MA 02118 (between Washington Street and Shawmut Ave in South End)
Map
For more information, please visit: www.metamovements.com/sitp
or email Kerry Thompson at londongirl21@hotmail.com

3. Landmark Orchestra on the Esplanade

Free and Accessible Concerts
Wednesdays, 7pm
July 13th - August 31st
DCR’s Hatch Shell on the Esplanade

Boston Landmarks Orchestra announces "Breaking Down Barriers" initiative to welcome people with disabilities to its concerts for 2011 summer season. The Orchestra will provide both Braille and large text programs at all of its concerts this summer. Sign language interpreters will be present for its August 3rd concert in collaboration with the Boston Lyric Opera.

"Boston Landmarks Orchestra is serious about making great music accessible to everyone. They've taken stock of the things that might make getting to the Hatch Shell for a concert difficult for some people and are working to make their concerts welcoming to everyone. They are ready to help and their concerts are free. Don't hesitate to accept this open invitation to enjoy Boston's Esplanade and a summer full of great music" - Charles J. Washburn, Executive Director VSA Massachusetts

For more information, please contact Jim Murray at (617)987-2000 ext. 13 or email JM@LANDMARKSORCHESTRA.ORG
www.landmarksorchestra.org

4. IOD Seeks Artists for its
2012 Calendar
The IOD is currently inviting artists to submit artwork to be considered for its 2012 Calendar.









These highly anticipated calendars are distributed each year to thousands of people around the world who are connected to the IOD's mission of strengthening communities and ensuring full access, equal opportunities, and participation for all persons. The deadline for submissions is Friday, July 29, 2011.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

From the Watertown Commission on Disabilities:

You are cordially invited to submit your artwork at an Exhibition, Able Arts, sponsored by the Watertown Commission on Disability for artists with disabilities.

The Exhibition will be held at the Watertown Free Public Library, 123 Main Street, Watertown, MA 02472 in October and November 2011.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE IS SEPTEMBER 1, 2011
kestrell: (Default)
My most favorite toy ever was a metal thingie I bought in a science store. It was basically made of wires hinged in all sorts of ways so that one could make an almost infinite variety of geometric shapes. I've been looking for a replacement for years, might this
http://www.smithsonianstore.com/new-arrivals/toys/chrome-tangle-68049.html
be it?
kestrell: (Default)
Also the introduction. The working title is _Six Ways of Looking at an Elephant_. I expect I will be doing more tweaking, and I need to do another pass in order to add the footnotes, but I think this is going to be the most difficult chapter--I keep forgetting how complicated lines, shapes, and forms really are. Also, I had to spend a lot of time figuring out the format of how to explain art terms, and deciding which terms absolutely needed to be in the first chapter without making that chapter huge ("elements of art" is pretty basic, "principles of design" can come later, especially since art instructors don't necessarily agree what all those principles are, just that they exist).

When I have a second chapter, I may ask for beta readers to give feedback on comprehensibility and whether I am squeezing too much into a chapter.
kestrell: (Default)
Here's a source for purchasing blank board books
http://www.creativekidds.com/index.cfm/page/cat/cat/Chunky%20Board/cid/5.htm
in case anyone wants to create a tactile book for the International Tactile Book competition which I mentioned a while back
http://kestrell.livejournal.com/646449.html
and I note that that vendor also sells blank game boards
http://www.creativekidds.com/index.cfm/page/cat/cat/Board%20Games/cid/6.htm

These are two projects which I am reallyhoping to accomplish this year.
kestrell: (Default)
Posted to the Art Beyond Sight mailing list

block quote start
Tactile artist Ann Cunningham and I are hosting a drop-in art room at this year's convention. The room will be open from 9 to 5 on Sunday, July 3, and
1 to 5 on Monday, July 4. All are welcome, regardless of age or experience with art. Artworks will be available for exploration, and there will be art materials (free of charge) for those who want to make their own creations.
Please drop by, and spread the word!

Also, we would love to find a few people who can greet folks at the door and orient them to the room. If you'd like to pitch in, please let me know.
See you in Orlando!

Debbie
dkent5817@att.net
773-203-1394 cell

block quote end
kestrell: (Default)
The American Printing House for the Blind (APH) is joining Typhlo & Tactus (TT)
in an international competition to promote tactile books.

TT, an organization comprised of western and eastern European nations, has conducted an annual tactile book competition for the past decade. This year's competition has been opened to the world. A panel of U.S. judges,
including APH, will review each entry. The top five books will be sent overseas for final adjudication by an international panel of children and adults with visual impairments, as well as professionals in the field.

A single winning entry will be chosen, along with ten shortlisted books. If you live in the U.S. or U.S. outlying areas, this is your chance to create a completed tactile book, designed for a child with visual impairment from birth to 12 years of age, by Friday, September 2, 2011!

The TT website provides the competition guidelines as well as a list of suggestions for desirable features in your tactile book creation! All entries must be
accompanied by an official TT entry form, found at the TT website
http://www.tactus.org/

U.S. entries can be sent to:

American Printing House for the Blind
1839 Frankfort Avenue
Louisville, KY 40206-0085
Attn: Suzette Wright, TT book competition



Originally posted to
Art_beyond_sight_theory_and_research mailing list
http://www.nfbnet.org/mailman/listinfo/art_beyond_sight_theory_and_research_nfbnet.org
kestrell: (Default)
I just heard about one of these machines. It is not, as I had hoped when first hearing of it, a piece of voice equipment which allows you to sing sad songs in French, but instead is a sort of embosser which uses special paper to make tactile images
http://www.humanware.com/en-usa/products/blindness/braille_embossers_and_writers/_details/id_147/piaf_picture_in_a_flash_tactile_graphic_maker.html

This reminds me that I still haven't tried puff paint--does anyone have a brand which they would recommend?
kestrell: (Default)
I've been doing a lot of book browsing and Web browsing, searching for information about blind people who create art. This is part of
my 2011 resolution to add more art to my life
http://kestrell.livejournal.com/622032.html .

So far, I have come up with four blind artists:
John Bramblitt http://www.bramblitt.net/ ,
Lisa Fittipaldi, author of _A Brush with Darkness_ http://www.lisafittipaldi.com/ ,
Gary Sergeant (an artist from England), and
Esref Armagan http://www.esrefarmagan.blogspot.com/ .

This last artist is probably the most video-recorded and written-about, as he is the main subject of many mainstream articles which have appeared in The New York Times, numerous science magazines and journals, and many videos which can be found on the Internet,such as the following titled
"Extraordinary People: The Artist with No Eyes"
http://www.armagan.com/paintings.asp .

All of these blind artists are painters, which I initially found kind of confusing. It was not that I couldn't figure out how they could develop techniques for creating images with paint on canvas, because in my experience a blind person who really wants to do something can usually figure out a way to do it. What confused me was how the art these blind artists produced could later be appreciated by other blind people, or even by the blind artists themselves after the paint had dried.
continued below cut )
kestrell: (Default)
Alexx and I went to Arisia on Saturday and I was pleasantly surprised to find that the new hotel really does solve a lot of the issues I had with way too many people in a too-small space. One of the events which I had come especially to hear was the concert by Sassafrass
http://adapalmer.com/sassafrass/index.html
a female a capella group which specializes in music featuring Norse myths and other geeky subjects. You can
listen to song samples
http://adapalmer.com/sassafrass/samples.html
and I absolutely recommend their Odin-Loki song, "My Brother, My Enemy," along with my personal favorite, "Toys for Big Kids."
I also had the chance to talk to lots of cool people, including Steve Berman (LJ user mroctober) writer and editor of Leithe Press www.lethepressbooks.com and
LJ user vvalkyri, who recently sent me a couple of
links about a fully articulated prosthetic hand
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/01/10/AR2011011006229.html
developed with a material called Living Skin at Touch Bionics
http://www.touchbionics.com/LIVINGSKIN .

The tactile tour of the art show was wonderful, thanks in large part to Fabrisse, who was our docent again this year, and who always makes a point of doing some research ahead of time so that she can tell us details about the works which we are touching, such as the medium and comments by the artists.
There were many wonderful pieces in the art show, but my favorite works were
the glass made to look like an actual meteorite, created by the artist guest of honor, Josh Simpson http://joshsimpson.com/site/
the book made with a glass eye in the front cover, the long dragon carved from a sinuous tree branch (I love carved objects that use the natural shape of the wood to influence the carved form), and the completely amazing coyote mask by Carol Hanson (who also took time to talk to me about wire). Also, an extra thanks to the artist who made a tactile drawing of the corset she had made--I am awed that she took eight hours to create the tactile drawing itself.

In the Dealers Room I bought a tactile t-shirt with an embossed Celtic design of the tree of life. This is an absolutely amazing t-shirt which uses some sort of mystery material that I am guessing must work similar to puff paint--the Celtic design of the tree, which appears to be made from one long continuous line, was laid down on a sort of stiff buckram-type material which was then laid beneath the t-shirt material, so that when the design material was activated (probably by a heat source such as a hair dryer), the design puffed up behind the t-shirt material on the front of the shirt.
You can find this and other tactile t-shirts and hoodies at the Earth Wisdom Web page, look for t-shirts labeled with the word "embossed"
http://www.earthwisdommusicandclothing.com/t-Shirts.html
and there are also some t-shirts which used embroidered designs.

Sadly, my attempt to find a copy of Diana Wynne Jones _The Merlin Conspiracy_ failed, so I will have to get it from Amazon.
kestrell: (Default)
Kes: Are you curious about how to describe live events and visual media to a blind person? Would you like to know how to provide audio description for your local events, community, classes, or YouTube videos? Are you interested in improving your ability to produce vivid word-pictures which tell a coherent story? Consider learning the art of audio description--the course is free online!
details on how to register below the cut )
kestrell: (Default)
Kes: As this article points out, Western culture tends to think of all art as visual, even that which specifically seems to invite touch, such as sculpture. I'm intrigued by the idea that blind people should come to an artwork with no background information though--I'm not sure I get the justification for this.

A feel for art
Natasha Wong
Friday, December 31, 2010
http://www.thestandard.com.hk/news_detail.asp?pp_cat=36&art_id=106577&sid=30777379&con_type=1&d_str=20101231

Auguste Rodin, the French genius in modeling human forms, often referred to his sculptures as une affaire de creux et de bosses - a case of hollows and bumps.

Despite the fact that art, especially sculpture, has a tactile quality, museum displays often come with a huge Do Not Touch sign.

But not at the Touching Art: Louvres Sculptures in Movement exhibition now on an Asian tour to Hong Kong. You are encouraged to appreciate art by touching and running your hands around it.

Endorsed by the Tactile Gallery at the Louvre Museum in Paris, the exhibition is on view at the Hong Kong Museum of Art.

The Tactile Gallery, opened in 1995, is targeted mainly at the blind and visually impaired. It is the only space in the Louvre where visitors can touch artworks with their hands with no stop signs, no guards or alarms.
continued below cut )
kestrell: (Default)
Kes: I'm particularly excited about this pairing of music and art as I think it has potential for allowing blind individuals to access art through its associations with the art form of music. It reminds me of a book which combines art and poetry titled _The Gazer's Spirit: Poems Speaking to Silent Works of Art_ by John Hollander which also possesses this sense of shared aesthetics between the visual and the audible.

All this month on WCDB in Boston host Cathy Fuller will be featuring a work of classical music that complements one of the works of art in the new Art of the Americas wing of the MFA.
Read about it by going to
995allclassical.org
and browsing to the link titled
Music and Art for January
Kes: I can't find any more specific info about when this airs on the radio, but I do know that it is between noon and four in the afternoon.
kestrell: (Default)
Kes: This was a really fabulous event last year--Fabrisse did an amazing job describing things and the artists present were wonderful. I am hoping to show up to this specific event and this event only--if anyone is interested in getting together for dinner afterward, leave a comment.

The tactile tour will be conducted on
Saturday from 5-6 p.m.
We will meett in front of the art show and cotton gloves will be provided for attendees. Artists are invited to be present in order to give brief descriptions of their work and answer questions.
Note: the non-visually impaired are welcome to participate in this event but people with disabilities will be given priority if the size of the group becomes an issue.

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